Asexual dating


Women find men more attractive once they find out he is desired by others, a new study suggests.Published in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers from the Universities of St Andrews, Durham and Exeter believe that a man is given an “attractiveness boost” when he is desired by other women.This is because he is perceived to be more kind, faithful and a better father.The study tested the idea of mate copying – where a person is preferred as a future romantic partner simply because they have relationship experience – by showing 49 female participants images of men’s faces, hands and a piece of art.The women were asked to rate how attractive they found each image before being shown the average rating given by the rest of the group.Interestingly, when the women were asked to re-rate each image shortly after, their answer changed in favour of the social information.On average, a participant changed their initial rating by around 13 per cent when rating the attractiveness of men’s faces depending on what other women had said.



The findings are also supported by an earlier study from Oklahoma State University which found that 90 per cent of single women were interested in a man they believed was taken, while a mere 59 per cent wanted him when told he was single."The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica" is identified as a contributor. You will notice that many of the encyclopedic articles on this site are attributed in full or in part to the Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica.The vast majority of articles attributed solely to the editors have been written, reviewed, or revised by external advisers and experts, and the lack of formal acknowledgment of their contributions was an editorial policy dating to the 1970s.In the absence of those authorities' names, Britannica's editors, who have played a key role in the development and maintenance of such articles, have been designated as the contributor.

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